Articles

Ze halen hun slag wel thuis: over particratie en het aanpassingsvermogen van Belgische partijen

Authors
  • Jean-Benoit Pilet orcid logo
  • Petra Meier

Abstract

Particracy has been widely used to describe Belgian politics after World War II. Yet, Belgian politics has changed. We examine five changes – the federalisation of the state architecture, diversification of the demos, erosion of political support, party’s dealignment and personalisation of politics – to evaluate how they have affected particracy in Belgium. The answer is twofold: particracy is still very strong, but it has changed. The three traditional party families that had institutionalised particracy in Belgium (Christian-democrats, socialists and liberals) had to face new challengers. They co-opted the most moderate ones (greens, regionalists), while excluding others (radical right/left). Intraparty democracy/participatory/transparency reforms, or changes to the electoral system, all of them opening the political system, were also implemented, but parties were able to overcome them. Yet, the ever-growing gap between traditional parties and citizens and the growth of new parties building upon voters’ dissatisfaction with traditional parties, may put particracy more radically into question.

How to Cite:

Pilet, J. & Meier, P., (2018) “Ze halen hun slag wel thuis: over particratie en het aanpassingsvermogen van Belgische partijen”, Res Publica 60(4), p.321-345.

Downloads:
Download pdf
View PDF

361 Views

23 Downloads

Published on
30 Dec 2018
Peer Reviewed
License