Human Resource Management (HRM) strategies and academic engagement in UK universities: Reflections on an academic-practitioner study

Abstract

In this paper we present and discuss find­ings from a small-scale mixed methods study exploring Human Resource Man­agement (HRM) strategies and academic engagement in six universities in England. A collaborative academic-practitioner model of research was adopted, with the explicit intention of generating research findings of interest and value to HR prac­titioners, managers, and researchers. Key findings included: a) some recognition by HR directors that the profession has been slow to provide metrics to evalu­ate/demonstrate HR ‘added value’; and b) a perception by academic staff of HR as part of ‘management armoury’, and the means by which unpopular initiatives are implemented; rather than a strategic driving force. Our identities and syner­gies as reflective practitioners and reflex­ive researchers are an important aspect of our academic-practitioner model. We will therefore reflect upon the meaning of these findings with regard to evidence-based HR practice. We argue that reflec­tive practice is important both for the role of HRM in the management of toxic emo­tion in the workplace, and the potential for the development of ethical HRM practice and organizational compassion.

How to Cite

Waddington, K. & Lister, J., (2013) “Human Resource Management (HRM) strategies and academic engagement in UK universities: Reflections on an academic-practitioner study”, EWOP in Practice 5(1), 12–25. doi: https://doi.org/10.21825/ewopinpractice.87075

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Kathryn Waddington (City University London)
Julie Lister (University of Westminster)

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